Learn about recent scams and how to recognize the warning signs.

  • August 2022 | Fraudulent Transaction Scam Alert, updated: An increased number of members are reporting text messages and phone calls from scammers claiming to be from MSGCU. They are falsely telling them there has been a fraudulent transaction on their account. These scammers then attempt to gather online banking credentials such as username or password and full credit or debit card numbers, including the 3-digit code on the back of the card, to "stop" the fraud.

    If you receive one of these calls, do not give out any of your account information and simply end the call. If you receive a suspicious text message, do not reply, click on text links or call the number back. Instead, call MSGCU directly at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help.

    While you may receive a call from our fraud department for unusual activity on your debit card, we will not ask for detailed account information such as your full account number or the 3 digit code on the back of your card.

    Remember: MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking credentials including password or log-in verification code via phone, text or email.
  • July 2022 | Fraudulent Transaction Scam Alert, updated: MSGCU members are reporting increased activity of fraud attempts. Members have reported phone calls and text messages from fraudsters claiming a “fraudulent transaction” on their account, and then attempt to gather banking details to stop the fraud. They may or may not spoof MSGCU’s phone number. If you receive a text message from someone claiming to be MSGCU, do not follow links in texts or call the number back from your text message. Always call MSGCU directly at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help. Remember: MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or log-in verification code via phone, text or email.
  • June 2022 | Fraudulent Transaction Scam Alert: Members have reported phone calls and text messages from fraudsters pretending to be MSGCU representatives. These scammers may even spoof MSGCU’s phone number and say they are calling about a “fraudulent transaction” on the member’s account and will need their banking details and credit/debit card information to stop the fraud. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or log-in verification code via phone, text or email. If you suspect you have been a victim of fraud, please contact MSGCU at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help.
  • March 2022 | Fake charity alert. Scammers are attempting to take advantage of charitable efforts supporting the Ukrainian people. Read these tips from the FTC on what to look for so any charitable donations go where you intend, or check out the Charity Search from Michigan’s Attorney General.
  • February 2022 | Resurgence of older scam activities: Members have reported scammers doubling down on old tricks. For example, scammers spoofing reputable companies like Microsoft or Norton attempt to get control of your device, whether computer, tablet, or mobile phone, by offering to “help,” and the “help” includes downloading software that allows scammers to remote in to your device and take control, sometimes including your online accounts. Similar reports include scammers freezing your device and having to pay a fee to unfreeze it.

    Scammers have also posed as popular companies like Amazon or PayPal, claiming they either owe you a refund or want to verify a pending transaction. These fraudsters get trusting victims to divulge personal information like their name and credit card number to “process” the refund or “block” the pending transaction. Unfortunately, neither the refund nor transaction actually exist and the victim's personal information is now compromised.

    Others report fraudsters claiming to be online retailers or other reputable companies who accidentally refunded you more than they should. It’s also popular for imposters claiming to be Norton or Microsoft to claim you signed up for a subscription you did not. In both scenarios, scammers claim to refund you more than you’re due and then ask for the difference back in gift cards, cryptocurrency, wire transfers or cash.

    Be on the lookout for red flags. Any unsolicited calls, texts, or emails asking for money is a red flag. Also be wary of any request to pay in cash, gift cards, cryptocurrency, through Bitcoin ATMs, or wire transfers.

    Never give your account credentials to anyone who contacts you out of the blue. If you receive an unsolicited phone call, text, or email, you can always contact the company directly (do not click links in the email or text). MSGCU recommends updating your account password and user ID or locking your debit or credit cards in online or mobile banking if you believe they may have been compromised. And if you believe you’ve been a victim of fraud or a scam, contact MSGCU immediately.

    Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your password, personal identification number (PIN), or log-in verification code.
  • January 2022 | QR Code Scam Alert: QR codes are helpful tools to avoid mistyping long website addresses on your mobile phone by taking a picture with your phone. Scammers are placing fraudulent QR codes in areas where consumers might expect to see them, like restaurants and on parking meters. Their goal is to trick you into providing your personal or payment information. When scanning a QR code, look at the website address that pops up, and look for graphics or other context to make sure you’re in the right place before you give up your information. If you suspect you have been a victim of fraud, please contact MSGCU at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help.
  • January 2022 | Auto Refund Scam Alert: Be alert – auto refund claims have high potential for fraudsters to act. The Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) will begin the process of refunding $400 per vehicle to Michigan drivers in the the second quarter of 2022. If you are contacted by anyone claiming to be a representative of the MCCA, your auto insurance company, or another official, end the communication with the individual reaching out, and contact your auto insurer directly.
  • November 2021 | Mobile Device Scam Alert: Fraudsters are hijacking mobile devices through SIM swapping and port-out scams that result in account takeovers. SIM swapping involves a fraudster impersonating you and getting your carrier to activate a fraudulent SIM card using a deceptive tactic called social engineering. Port-out scams involve fraudsters getting your mobile phone onto a new carrier (this is called “porting”). Protect yourself by placing a port freeze, PIN, or password on your mobile carrier account. This prevents your number from being ported out to another carrier without you first removing the freeze or entering the PIN or password. Ask your phone carrier for additional features that could potentially stop SIM swapping. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or log-in verification code.
  • March 2021 | Card Locked Scam Alert: Members have reported receiving a text from fraudsters attempting to impersonate MSGCU. The text says a card is locked and provides a phone number to call. Do not call an unrecognized number. Always call MSGCU directly at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 for assistance. If you have received a text like this, please also notify us immediately. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your password, personal identification number (PIN), or log-in verification code.
  • February 2021 | Visa Block Scam Alert: Members have reported receiving texts from fraudsters stating there's a "Visa block" on their card. The scammers provide a phone number to call and proceed to ask for banking details and credit/debit card information to unblock the card. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or verification code.
  • January 2021 | PayPal Scam Alert: Members have reported phone calls and texts from fraudsters pretending to be MSGCU representatives. These scammers may even spoof MSGCU’s phone number and say they are calling about a “PayPal scam” affecting the member’s account and will need their banking details to stop the fraud.
  • January 2021 | Fraudulent Transaction Scam Alert: Members have reported phone calls and texts from fraudsters pretending to be MSGCU representatives. These scammers may even spoof MSGCU’s phone number and say they are calling about a “fraudulent transaction” on the member’s account and will need their banking details and credit/debit card information to stop the fraud. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or verification code.
  • September 2020 | Secret Shopper Scam Alert: If someone you don’t know wants to pay you by check but wants you to send some of the money back, beware! It’s a scam that could cost you thousands of dollars. Learn more from the Federal Trade Commission.
  • Telephone scammers are trying to steal consumers’ personal information. They’ll “spoof” a familiar looking phone number, like a number close to your financial institution’s number. The scammer will ask you to verify your transaction history. During the call, they will ask for your card number, account number and PIN. Then they use the information to commit fraud. Remember, MSGCU will never ask for your PIN. Hang up and call the number on the back of your debit or credit card to verify the caller.

Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your password, personal identification number (PIN), or log-in verification code. If you suspect you have been a victim of fraud, please contact MSGCU at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help.

 

Protect your information during the pandemic.

  • Accessing your credit is important, especially during the ongoing pandemic. That's why Equifax, Experian and TransUnion are continuing to offer free weekly online credit reports. Request yours.
  • Criminals are disguising themselves as representatives from the World Health Organization (WHO) trying to steal money or sensitive information. WHO’s only call for donations is the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund found at www.who.int/donate. Any other fund appearing to be from WHO is a scam.
  • Watch out for emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or the World Health Organization (WHO) or other “experts” saying that they have information about the virus. Always refer to www.CDC.gov and www.who.int for trusted information.
  • Ignore online offers for vaccinations. Only trust the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or World Health Organization (WHO) websites for medical breakthrough information.
  • Be alert to so-called COVID-19 “cure” and “vaccination” stocks that promise to make you lots of money. Do your homework before making any decisions. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is a good place to start.
  • Did you know Michigan protects consumers against price gouging for many items such as hand sanitizer, face masks and cleaning supplies? Report a retailer that has raised their prices to excessive levels to Michigan’s Attorney General.