Learn about recent scams and how to recognize the warning signs.

  • November 2021 | Mobile Device Scam Alert: Fraudsters are hijacking mobile devices through SIM swapping and port-out scams that result in account takeovers. SIM swapping involves a fraudster impersonating you and getting your carrier to activate a fraudulent SIM card using a deceptive tactic called social engineering. Port-out scams involve fraudsters getting your mobile phone onto a new carrier (this is called “porting”). Protect yourself by placing a port freeze, PIN, or password on your mobile carrier account. This prevents your number from being ported out to another carrier without you first removing the freeze or entering the PIN or password. Ask your phone carrier for additional features that could potentially stop SIM swapping. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or log-in verification code.
  • March 2021 | Card Locked Scam Alert: Members have reported receiving a text from fraudsters attempting to impersonate MSGCU. The text says a card is locked and provides a phone number to call. Do not call an unrecognized number. Always call MSGCU directly at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 for assistance. If you have received a text like this, please also notify us immediately. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your password, personal identification number (PIN), or log-in verification code.
  • February 2021 | Visa Block Scam Alert: Members have reported receiving texts from fraudsters stating there's a "Visa block" on their card. The scammers provide a phone number to call and proceed to ask for banking details and credit/debit card information to unblock the card. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or verification code.
  • January 2021 | PayPal Scam Alert: Members have reported phone calls and texts from fraudsters pretending to be MSGCU representatives. These scammers may even spoof MSGCU’s phone number and say they are calling about a “PayPal scam” affecting the member’s account and will need their banking details to stop the fraud.
  • January 2021 | Fraudulent Transaction Scam Alert: Members have reported phone calls and texts from fraudsters pretending to be MSGCU representatives. These scammers may even spoof MSGCU’s phone number and say they are calling about a “fraudulent transaction” on the member’s account and will need their banking details and credit/debit card information to stop the fraud. Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your online banking username, password, or verification code.
  • September 2020 | Secret Shopper Scam Alert: If someone you don’t know wants to pay you by check but wants you to send some of the money back, beware! It’s a scam that could cost you thousands of dollars. Learn more from the Federal Trade Commission.
  • Telephone scammers are trying to steal consumers’ personal information. They’ll “spoof” a familiar looking phone number, like a number close to your financial institution’s number. The scammer will ask you to verify your transaction history. During the call, they will ask for your card number, account number and PIN. Then they use the information to commit fraud. Remember, MSGCU will never ask for your PIN. Hang up and call the number on the back of your debit or credit card to verify the caller.

Remember, MSGCU will NEVER ask for your password, personal identification number (PIN), or log-in verification code. If you suspect you have been a victim of fraud, please contact MSGCU at (586) 263-8800 or (866) 674-2848 immediately so we can help.

 

Protect your information during the pandemic.

  • Criminals are disguising themselves as representatives from the World Health Organization (WHO) trying to steal money or sensitive information. WHO’s only call for donations is the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund found at www.who.int/donate. Any other fund appearing to be from WHO is a scam.
  • Watch out for emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or the World Health Organization (WHO) or other “experts” saying that they have information about the virus. Always refer to www.CDC.gov and www.who.int for trusted information.
  • Ignore online offers for vaccinations. Only trust the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or World Health Organization (WHO) websites for medical breakthrough information.
  • Be alert to so-called COVID-19 “cure” and “vaccination” stocks that promise to make you lots of money. Do your homework before making any decisions. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is a good place to start.
  • Did you know Michigan protects consumers against price gouging for many items such as hand sanitizer, face masks and cleaning supplies? Report a retailer that has raised their prices to excessive levels to Michigan’s Attorney General.